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4th Grade

 

 

2016 -2017

 FOURTH GRADE LEARNING TARGETS

 

Reading Process

 

1.  Read fourth-grade text with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

a)  I can read fourth-grade text with accuracy, purpose and understanding.

b)  I can read fourth-grade level prose and poetry with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression.

c)  I can use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.      

 

2.   Apply word study skills to read multi-syllable words and compound words.

a) I can recognize letter, spelling, and syllable patterns.

b) I can identify and interpret parts of words including root words, prefixes, suffixes, and compound words.

c) I can read multi-syllable words by breaking them apart into chunks.

 

Reading Comprehension & Application

 

3.   Apply comprehension strategies to interpret informational texts.

a) I can select and use appropriate resources (dictionaries, thesauruses, glossaries, etc.), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

b) I can use and interpret text features, including headings, subheadings, captions, graphics, and bolded and italicized words, for understanding.

c) I can distinguish between the main idea and supporting details.

d) I can self-monitor understanding of text (rereading, reading ahead, questioning, etc.).

e) I can interpret the overall structure of ideas, concepts, events, or information in a text or a part of a text.

f) I can compare and contrast firsthand and secondhand accounts of the same events.

g) I can refer to details and examples from a text when making conclusions and drawing inferences.

h) I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to speak or write about the subject knowledgeably.

i)  I can summarize informational texts.

 

4.  Apply comprehension strategies to interpret fictional texts.

a)  I can distinguish between the main idea and supporting details.

b)  I can self-monitor understanding of text (rereading, reading ahead, questioning, etc.).

c)  I can interpret figurative language (similes, metaphors, idioms, adages, and proverbs).

d)  I can interpret analogies.

e)  I can interpret the overall structure of ideas, concepts, events, or information in a text or a part of a text.

f)  I can compare and contrast firsthand and secondhand accounts of the same events.

g) I can refer to details and examples from a text when making conclusions and drawing inferences.

h) I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to speak or write about the subject knowledgeably.

i)  I can summarize fictional texts.

 

5.  Identify literary elements and analyze the interaction between plot and characters.

a) I can analyze the sequence of events in depth.

b) I can identify and explain the conflict and resolution of a story.

c) I can explain the relationship between cause and effect.

d) I can analyze character development, character traits, and motivations.

e) I can compare and contrast points of view including the differences between first and third person narrations.

f) I can identify setting and explain its relevance.

g) I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. (author’s purpose)

h) I can determine the theme of a story, drama or poem from details in the text.

 

6.  Distinguish features of a variety of literary genres

a) I can distinguish between a variety of genres (realistic,   fantasy, biography, historical fiction, myths, poetry, etc.).

b) I can explain major differences among poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama.

c) I can identify regional and cultural differences which are reflected in multicultural texts.

d) I can compare and contrast the different perspectives of similar themes, topics and sequence of events.

 

Writing and Communication

 

7.  Listen and communicate effectively within a fourth-grade classroom.

a) I can recognize a purpose through listening.

b) I can engage in meaningful conversations about texts by reviewing key ideas and asking clarification questions.

c) I can explain how the words in a text and illustrations help the reader to visualize the elements of a story.

d) I can carry out assigned roles in a variety of collaborative discussions.

e) I can incorporate diverse media into a presentation to enhance its meaning.

f)  I can identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support a particular point.

g) I can differentiate between contexts that call for formal and informal discourse.

 

8.  Organize and compose persuasive texts.

a) I can introduce the topic and state my opinion.

b) I can supply reasons to support my opinion.

c) I can use transition words.

d) I can restate my opinion in a conclusion.

e) I can develop and strengthen my writing through planning, revising, and editing with guidance and support from peers and adults.

f) I can use technology to produce, publish, and share writing with some guidance and support from adults.

 

9.  Organize and compose narrative texts.

a) I can introduce characters, narrators, and situations.

b) I can use transitions to connect the sequence of events.

c) I can use dialogue and sensory details to enhance the plot of the story.

d) I can use concrete words, strong verbs, and descriptive phrases.

e) I can develop characters and setting in my narrative text.

f) I can compose a narrative text with a main event.

g) I can provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

h) I can develop and strengthen my writing through planning, revising, and editing with guidance and support from peers and adults.

i) I can use technology to produce, publish, and share writing with some guidance and support from adults.

 

10.  Organize and compose expository texts.

a) I can write an introductory paragraph.

b) I can examine a topic and clearly convey information in three paragraphs.

c) I can develop the topic with facts, concrete details, quotations, and other information and examples.

d) I can use transition words.

e) I can use precise language and content-specific vocabulary to explain the topic.

f) I can provide a concluding paragraph.

g) I can develop and strengthen my writing through planning, revising, and editing with guidance and support from peers and adults.

h) I can use technology to produce, publish, and share writing with some guidance and support from adults.

 

Mechanics & Grammar

 

11.  Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a) I can use commas in a compound sentence.

b) I can apply correct punctuation in a direct quotation.

c) I can avoid using sentence fragments and run-on sentences  

d) I can use correct capitalization.

e) I can spell fourth-grade words effectively in writing, consulting references as needed.

 

12.  Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a) I can use correct subject-verb agreement in a sentence.

b) I can form and use prepositional phrases.

c) I can correctly use frequently confused words (there, their, and they’re).

d) I can use relative pronouns and relative adverbs.

e) I can form and use the progressive verb tenses.

f) I can use modal auxiliaries to convey various conditions.

g) I can order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns.

 

Vocabulary

 

13.  Apply newly acquired vocabulary in writing and oral communications.

a) I can infer the meaning of a word when given a synonym and/or antonym.

b) I can analyze context clues to construct meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words.

c) I can use prefixes, suffixes, and root words including Greek and Latin roots to determine the meanings of words.

d) I can define and incorporate vocabulary into everyday communications.

e) I can acquire and use content-specific words and phrases.

 Research

 14.  Utilize skills needed to research a topic.

a) I can conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

b) I can recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources.

c) I can prioritize information, take notes, and provide a list of sources.

d) I can draw evidence from texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 

Math Learning Targets

 

Number and Operations in Base Ten

 

1.  Evaluate numbers through the millions place.

a) I can recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents 10 times what it represents in the place to its right.

b) I can determine the place value of a multi-digit whole     number to the hundred thousands place.

c) I can compare and order multi-digit whole numbers through the hundred thousands based on the meaning of the digits in each place using >, < and =.

d) I can use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.

e) I can read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base ten numerals, word, expanded, and standard form.

  

2.  Perform the four operations with multi-digit whole numbers using place value understanding.

a) I can fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

b) I can multiply a whole number up to four digits by a one-digit whole number using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.

c) I can multiply two two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.

d) I can divide four-digit numbers by one-digit divisors using strategies based on place value and the properties of     operations and/or the relationship between multiplication and division.

e) I can illustrate and explain the calculations of multiplication by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

f) I can illustrate and explain the calculations of division by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

g) I can find the factors of whole numbers through 100.

h) I can recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors.

i) I can determine whether a given whole number in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one digit number.

j) I can determine whether a given whole number in the range of 1-100 is prime or composite.

 

Number and Operations-Fractions

(Grade 4 expectations in this domain are limited to fractions with denominators 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 100)

 

3.  Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.

a) I can explain why equivalent fractions are equal by using visual fraction models including number lines, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions are the same size.

b) I can recognize and generate equivalent fractions.

c) I can compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators by creating a common denominator or comparing to a benchmark fraction like 1/2.

d) I can recognize that comparisons are valid only when two fractions refer to the same whole.

e) I can compare fractions using >, <, or = and justify the comparison.

 

4.  Perform operations with fractions.

a) I can add and subtract fractions by joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

b) I can decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way and justify with a

fractional model 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8 or 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8).

c) I can add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers with common denominators.

d) I can solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions with common denominators by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.

e) I can write a fraction as a product of a whole number and a unit fraction (5/4 as the product of 5 x 1/4).

f) I can write a product of a whole number and a fraction as a product of a whole number and a unit fraction (3 x 2/5 as 6 x 1/5 ).

g) I can multiply a fraction by a whole number.

h) I can solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.

 

5.  Understand decimal notation for fractions and compare decimal fractions.

a) I can express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100 and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.

b) I can use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100.

c)  I can compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size.

d) I can recognize that comparisons are valid only when two decimals refer to the same whole.

e)  I can compare decimals using >, <, or = and justify the comparison by using a visual model.

 

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

 

6.  Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.

a) I can interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison.

b) I can represent verbal statements as multiplication equations.

c) I can multiply or divide to solve word problems by using drawings and equations.

d) I can solve multi-step word problems using the four operations.

e) I can represent an unknown quantity in word problems with a variable.

f) I can assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation.

g) I can generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule and identify other features of the pattern.

  

Geometry

 

7.  Construct lines and angles, and classify shapes and figures by properties of their lines and angles.

a) I can draw points, lines, line segments, rays, perpendicular, and parallel lines.

b) I can draw right, acute, obtuse, and straight angles.

c) I can identify lines and angles in two-dimensional figures.

d) I can classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size.

e) I can identify and draw lines of symmetry.

 

 8.  Understand concepts of angle and measure angles.

a) I can recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint.

b) I can relate angles and their measurements to fractional parts of a circle.

c) I can measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor.

d) I can sketch angles of specified measure.

e) I can recognize that the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts.

f) I can solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real-world or mathematical problems.

 

Measurement and Data

 

9.  Measure and convert units in a given measurement system.

a) I can identify relative sizes of measurement units (km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz; l, ml; hr, min, sec) within one system of units.

b) I can convert units within the same system from larger to smaller units and smaller to larger units using a two column table.

c) I can use the four operations to solve word problems involving measurement (distance, time, volume, mass, and money), including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit.

d) I can represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

e) I can calculate area and perimeter by using the formulas for rectangles in real-world and mathematical problems.

 

10.  Represent and interpret data.

a)  I can make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit.

b)  I can solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots.

 

Mathematical Practices

 

11.  Implement best practices in mathematics.

a) I can persevere when solving problems.

b) I can think about numbers in many ways.

c) I can defend my thinking and try to understand the thinking of others.

d) I can show my work in many different ways.

e) I can use math tools and tell why I chose them.

f) I can work carefully and check my work.

g) I can use what I know to solve new problems.

h) I can look for and use rules and patterns.  

 

 

Science Learning Targets 

 

Energy

 

1.   Investigate the transference of energy and waves in relation to sound, light, motion, electricity, and heat. 

a) I can explain the relationship between speed and energy of an object. 

b) I can investigate to determine changes in energy resulting from increases or decreases in speed that occur when objects collide. 

c) I can justify that heat can be produced and transferred in many ways. (e.g. friction, conduction, convection, and radiation). 

d) I can develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength to prove that waves can cause objects to move.* 

e) I can create and use models to show patterns are a way to transfer information. (e.g. binary coding, morse code, drumming, coding) 

f)  I can demonstrate the flow of an electric circuit. 

g) I can construct a model to explain that an object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eye. 

h) I can describe how renewable and nonrenewable resources can affect our environment. 

i)  I can design, construct, and test a device that changes energy from one form to another.*

 

 Living Things

 

2. Examine the structures, systems, and processes that living things use to survive. 

a) I can examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. (e.g. thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) 

b) I can examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. (e.g heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin)

c) I can obtain and communicate information explaining that humans have systems that interact with one another for digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, movement, control, coordination, (skeletal, muscular, and nervous) and protection from disease. 

d) I can investigate different ways animals receive information through the senses, process that information, and respond to it in different ways.

 

 Earth Systems 

 

3. Analyze patterns and properties of rocks and soils.

a) I can construct explanations by citing evidence found in patterns of rock formations and fossils in rock layers to prove that Earth changes over time both slowly and rapidly.

b) I can carry out an investigation to examine properties of soils and soil types. (e.g. color, texture, capacity to retain water, ability to support plant growth)

  

4. Evaluate and analyze data to determine the effects of weathering, erosion, and natural disasters. 

a) I can describe patterns of Earth’s features on land and the ocean floor using data from maps. 

b) I can explore information to support the claim that landforms are the result of a combination of constructive (volcanic eruptions and sediment deposition) and destructive (erosion and weathering) forces.

c) I can analyze and interpret data to determine the effects of weathering and rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, and vegetation (using one single form of weathering or erosion at a time.) 

d) I can formulate and evaluate solutions to limit the effects of natural Earth processes on humans (e.g. designing earthquake, tornado, or hurricane-resistant buildings; improving the monitoring of volcanic activity). 

 

 

Alabama History - Social Studies Learning Targets 

 

1. Determine the relationship of the five geographic regions of Alabama to the movement of Alabama settlers during the nineteenth century. 

a) I can identify Alabama’s natural resources. 

b) I can identify Alabama’s five geographic regions. 

c) I can describe the human environments of Alabama as they relate to settlement during the nineteenth century (i.e housing, roads, and places).

d) I can explain the impact Alabama’s climate has in the different geographic regions of the state. 

 

2. Analyze the impact of the European explorers and settlers on Alabama. 

a) I can identify the location of European settlements and forts on early maps of Alabama (e.g. Fort Conde, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims). 

b) I can trace the routes of early explorers. (i.e. DeSoto, Ponce de Leon) 

c) I can describe economic relationships between Native Americans and explorers. 

d) I can explain the reasons for conflicts between European and American Indians from 1519-1840. 

 

3. Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812 and the Creek War on Alabama. 

a) I can explain the significant leaders of the Creek War. 

b) I can describe the significant battles of the War of 1812 and the Creek War. 

c) I can determine the impact made by the forced relocation of the American Indians by Andrew Jackson. 

d) I can describe the adoption of European culture by the American Indians.

 e) I can explain the economic impact of the acquisition of tribal land in Alabama after the War of 1812.

 f)  I can explain the impact the Trail of Tears had on the lives, rights, and territories of Alabama American Indians.

 

 

4. Describe Alabama’s entry into statehood and the establishment of its three branches of government. 

a) I can explain reasons for changes in location of the state capital. 

b) I can describe the three branches of government and constitutions. 

c) I can identify major political figures involved in Alabama’s statehood (Andrew Jackson, William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, William Rufus King).

 

 

5. Describe the lifestyles of plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople in the early nineteenth century. 

a) I can interpret the impact legal codes had on the early nineteenth century. 

b) I can describe the culture during the early nineteenth-century in Alabama (i.e housing, education, religion, recreation). 

c) I can determine the primary means of transportation. 

d) I can identify major areas of agricultural production in Alabama (Black Belt, fertile river valleys). 

 

6. Explain Alabama’s economic and military role during the Civil War. 

a) I can explain reasons for Alabama’s secession in the Union. 

b) I can identify Alabama’s role in the organization of the Confederacy. (hosting secession convention, inauguration ceremony, capital of the Confederacy) 

c) I can interpret the Articles of the Confederation and the Gettysburg Address. 

d) I can recognize military leaders from Alabama. 

e) I can compare the roles of women on the homefront as well as the battlefront. 

f)  I can identify the provision of military supplies through the Port of Mobile and Selma. 

g) I can recognize the impact the Civil War had on Alabama’s economic structure, transportation infrastructure, and citizens.

 

 7. Analyze political and economic issues Alabama faced during Reconstruction. 

a) I can interpret the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments of the Constitution of the United States. 

b) I can identify African Americans who had an impact on Alabama’s Reconstruction. 

c) I can analyze the impact of military rule, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Alabama’s re-admittance to the Union during Reconstruction. 

d) I can explain the role of sharecropping and tenant farming. 

e) I can identify major political parties in Alabama during Reconstruction. 

 

8. Analyze the social and educational changes during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. 

a) I can describe the implementation of Plessy versus Ferguson, “separate but not equal” court decision, and birth of the NAACP. 

b) I can explain the Jim Crow Laws.

c) I can identify Alabamians who made contributions in the fields of science, education, the arts, politics, and business. 

d) I can analyze the establishment of normal schools and colleges (Auburn, Tuskegee, Alabama State University, A&M, etc.).

 

9. Describe the impact of World War I on the citizens of Alabama. 

a) I can describe the impact of Alabama’s military installations and training facilities during World War I. 

b) I can explain the migration of African Americans from Alabama to the North and West. 

c) I can identify World War I technologies, including airplanes, machine guns, and chemical warfare. 

d) I can recognize Alabama participants in World War I (167th Regiment of the Rainbow Division). 

e) I can understand the increased production of goods for World War I. 

 

10. Explain the impact the 1920s and the Great Depression had on different socioeconomic groups in Alabama. 

a) I can obtain and communicate information explaining the 1920s era (employment opportunities, wages, overproduction, stock market crash) and the Great Depression (over-cropping, unemployment, poverty). 

b) I can explain how supply and demand impacted Alabama’s economy during the 1920s and the Great Depression. 

 

11. Investigate to determine the economic and social impact World War II had on Alabamians. 

a) I can describe the entry of women into the workforce, job opportunities, rationing, military recruitment, the draft, and racial consciousness of WWII. 

b) I can recognize Alabama’s key participants in WWII (Tuskegee Airmen, women in the military). 

c) I can justify the strategic placement of military bases in Alabama (Redstone Arsenal, Fort Rucker, Fort McClellan, and Craig Air Force Base). 

 

12. Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama. 

a) I can describe the major events of the modern Civil Rights Movement (Montgomery Bus Boycott, 16th Street Baptist Church, Selma to Montgomery March, Freedom Riders). 

b) I can associate and apply common terms from this era (discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights).

c) I can recognize influential people from the Civil Rights era. (MLK, Rosa Parks, George Wallace, Malcolm X). 

d) I can explain the benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954. 

 

13. Identify events that have impacted Alabama since 1950. 

a) I can identify the Korean Conflict, the Cold War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf, and the War on Terrorism. 

b) I can describe how technological advancements brought change to Alabamians (telephone, refrigerator, automobile, wireless internet, space technologies). 

c) I can relate Alabama’s economy to the influence of foreign-based industry. 

d) I can determine the impact of population growth, cities, major road systems, demographics, and major resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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